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Science with Mr. Musselman at Camp EagleFox September 25, 2015

Posted by MrMusselman in Science Center.
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With roughly a classroom’s worth of students between Memorial and Fox Hill fifth-grades choosing not to attend Camp Bourndale, Mrs. Olshaw and Mrs. Walsh brought their students together to create “Camp Eagle-Fox.” Mr. Musselman joined the campers on their first day to facilitate an exciting morning of science investigations and activities.

A squid dissection immediately had students buzzing with excitement as they explored the exterior adaptations of their squid specimens before taking their first snips with surgical scissors into their squid’s interior.

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Once inside, students examined the squid’s gills, hearts, and ink sac while learning about their function and the role they play to help the squid survive. Students particularly enjoyed removing the “pen” that gives the squid its long, pointed structure to write their names with the ink found inside the sac!

Writing our name with ink from the squids ink sack!

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Students wrapped up their investigation by removing the beak and eyeballs from the head of the squid. Students were surprised to find just how small the eyeball was and how similar the two-part beak of the squid was when compared to birds of prey like hawks and falcons!

After cleanup students were treated to an exciting round of “Mountain Lion Hunt” where they were introduced to the concept of a habitat’s “carrying capacity,” the maximum number of organism a habitat is able to sustain. Students played the role of mountain lions hunting squirrels, rabbits, beavers, and deer in order to obtain enough food to survive for the month. Some students were burdened with additional challenges, including an injured leg and the need to care for two additional mountain lion cubs!

Hunting our prey in a model carrying capacity activity. #elemsci

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When the game was finished, several of the mountain lions had been unable to gather enough food to survive while others had plenty. Ideas were shared about how to make the process more fair so that everyone was able to eat leading to some mathematical calculations about just how many mountain lions could survive on the food available.

Just 17 mountain lions could survive in our model habitat. Eventhough there were only 16 mountain lions playing the game, only 7 survived when left to fend for themselves!

Just 17 mountain lions could survive in our model habitat. Eventhough there were only 16 mountain lions playing the game, only 7 survived when left to fend for themselves!

Students were prompted with tough questions. Do you feed yourself or your mountain lion cubs first? What if all the rabbits died of disease and there was not enough food to go around for even half the mountain lions? Finally students were left to ponder how well this game could be applied to humans on Earth. Students noted that humans had a much more diverse diet than mountain lions, but also recognized that problems such as the amount of water in California, and the hungry found in our own neighborhoods had some similarities. Great food for thought as our students grow and become even greater consumers!

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