jump to navigation

Summer Robotics “Gearing Up” – Register Now! April 14, 2015

Posted by MrMusselman in Burlington Community, Science Center.
Tags: , , ,
add a comment

IMG_4521 IMG_4523IMG_4518

Students entering grades 4 and 5 for the 2015/2016 school year may participate in this new program spun from the popular “Robotics Clubs” that are being run for the first time in several of our elementary schools this year. Students will primarily learn how to construct and program robots constructed from the LEGO robotics EV3 kits and complete challenges that will explore the basics behind robot design and programming. Along the way students will also have an opportunity to meet professionals in STEM careers volunteering their time to introduce important ideas around robotics design and may also discuss simple ethical dilemmas faced by inventors using robots not previously used.

Burlington is offering its students the opportunity to attend a two-week session (Monday through Thursday). Tuition is $250. To register for this camp complete the following registration and emergency form and send to Rosemary Desousa at 123 Cambridge Street, Burlington.

Dates: July 20, 2015 – July 30, 2015, (8 five-hour weekday sessions)

Time: 8:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Place: Memorial Elementary School

Transportation to and from camp: Arranged by parents

Eagle Scout Elementary Bird House Project April 10, 2015

Posted by bsciencecenter in Uncategorized.
add a comment

The Science Center would like to congratulate scout Joe Plummer for completing his Eagle Scout service project.  Joe designed, built and installed 6 bird houses at each of the Elementary Schools in Burlington.  The bird houses are spread around the schoolyard, where students, teachers and visitors will be able to enjoy watching birds raise their young.  Pictured below are the Joe, scouts, and the leaders whom helped install the houses (while it was snowing!).  We have already received many compliments from the staff and students on how much they enjoy the houses.  We look forward to seeing them when the birds start to lay their eggs this spring.  Thank you Joe for all your hard work and dedication to the Burlington community!

Joe with the old bird houses

Joe with the old bird houses

Assembling the bird houses…….

Assembling the bird houses

DSC08336

DSC08357

Installing the houses at the Elementary schools….

DSC03282

DSC03289

photo 1 (3)

All ready for the birds!

DSC08460

photo 2 (3)

 

 

 

 

 

 

photo 3 (4)

DSC03282

 

Girl Scouts Earn Animal Care Badge via the Science Center April 9, 2015

Posted by bsciencecenter in Uncategorized.
add a comment

A girl Scout troop recently visited the Science Center, working towards their badge on animal care.  The group was very excited for the opportunity to visit the center and learn about the responsibility of caring for a living thing.

FullSizeRender-1  Ms. Pavlicek started by asking questions about what to do before considering having a pet.  They then discussed what things you need to think about when buying a pet (cage, food, water, exercise, toys, vet care) and how we treat the animal while in our care.

IMG_8641

Ms. P then split the troop up into 3 groups and brought out a different animal for each group. The groups brainstormed what care the animal needed, the environment it needed to live in and any questions about the critter.  They discussed the idead from each group and then had an opportunity to interact with the animal.  The girls proceeded to put the animal back into the cage it lived in and compared the living environment to the inforamtion the group had discussed earlier.

IMG_8640

 

IMG_8639

The girl scouts had designed and developed enrichment toys for the rodents at the Science Center.  They each presented their toy to Ms. P and described how the animal would ineract with it.

IMG_8642

IMG_8643

The last part of the visit involved the troop being ablw to tour the live animal room at the center.  They were able to give out treats to the animals, handle particular animals they were iinterested in and ask any questions about an animal and its care.

IMG_8650

FullSizeRender

Visit to Atria Retirment Home with Animals April 7, 2015

Posted by bsciencecenter in Uncategorized.
add a comment

The Science Center’s high school aides visited the Atria Retirement Home last week with some live animals.  The high school students had chosen an animal to share and were excited to visit with the residents.  The residents were able to interact and ask questions about the animals.  There were lots of smiles and good conversation throughout the visit.  It was great to see the interaction between the students, residents and the animals.

IMG_8599

IMG_8604

IMG_8607

FullSizeRender

IMG_8609

IMG_8600

 

 

Science Center Receives Infrared Camera Tool Thanks to BEF April 2, 2015

Posted by MrMusselman in Burlington Community, Science Center.
Tags: , ,
add a comment

Yesterday the Science Center received in the mail its very own infrared camera! An infrared camera is designed to collect infrared, or “heat” energy as opposed to light energy most cameras collect through their lens! The FLIR One camera attaches to the back of any iPhone 5 or 5S and can be wirelessly broadcast to screens and projectors with the help of an Apple TV device. All of these tools were made possible with the help of a grant from the Burlington Education Foundation.

As the grant writer, Mr. Musselman has been busying “play-testing” the tool to determine its full capabilities and potential for classroom demonstrations and instructional videos across the K-12 curriculum. The camera comes with photo and video capabilities. Check out the pictures below to see just how versatile the camera is and how it may potentially be used in our classrooms moving forward. If you have a suggestion, or a question you’d like to have explored by the Science Center and its new camera, please let us know in the comments section below or on our facebook page and infrared camera post!

Photo Apr 02, 11 30 51

How much cold soda is in this paper cup?

Photo Apr 02, 11 30 28

Our IR camera knows! Dark colors = cold temperatures!


Where is the hedgehog hiding?

Where is the hedgehog hiding?

Her body heat radiates right through her plastic home!

Her body heat radiates right through her plastic home!


Why is the turtle so tough to spot in infrared?

Why is the turtle so tough to spot in infrared?

Turtles are cold-blooded! That means they have the same temperature as their environment. No wonder turtles love to sit out in the sun!

Turtles are cold-blooded! That means they have the same temperature as their environment. No wonder turtles love to sit out in the sun!


What happens to our hand temperature when we hold on to ice cubes?

What happens to our hand temperature when we hold on to ice cubes?

Our hand and ice cubes in infrared.

Our hand and ice cubes in infrared.

Grabbing the ice cubes...

Grabbing the ice cubes…

Holding on tight for 30 seconds. This hurts!

Holding on tight for 30 seconds. This hurts!

Why are my hands purple?

Why are my hands purple?

What happens if I put my hand down on the table?

What happens if I put my hand down on the table?

Now the table surface is cooler too!

Now the table surface is cooler too!


This video was a first take with our new camera. I realized later the camera can be oriented in landscape so the temperature can be read more easily and the color spectrum can be “locked” so that the temperatures do not appear to keep recalibrating to use the whole spectrum. You can also change the color scheme from “iron” to “lava” to just about everything in between.

The Science Center can’t thank the Burlington Education Foundation enough for their continued support. Last year they purchased a wonderful new Weather Station and they continue to encourage us to submit proposals in the future. The BEF is a wonderful resource for the Burlington teachers and schools and we encourage all community members to continue their support of this great organization!

Flamingo Experts Visit Memorial First Graders April 1, 2015

Posted by MrMusselman in Science Center.
Tags: , , ,
1 comment so far

When Mrs. Panagiotopoulos’ writing chose flamingos as the subject of their research project, Mr. Musselman put in a call with some friends at the Stone and Franklin Park Zoo. The Stone Zoo is home to one of the most successful flamingo hatcheries in the United States! Fast forward to this afternoon, when zoo educators Miss Marley and Miss Caitlin came to visit Mrs. P’s class and share some feathery facts with the curious first graders.

Flamingo 1

Miss Marley with video from the flamingo hatchery at the Stone Zoo.

 

Miss Marley and Miss Caitlin started by sharing some video filmed by the chief flamingo curator talking about some of the special things zoo keepers do to keep track of the flamingos and their offspring, set to hatch next month. They put little bands with different colors on the flamingos’ legs to indicate whether they are male or female.

Because the shrimp-like krill flamingos eat can be expensive, zoo keepers feed the local flamingos a mix of nutrients that flamingos need in a mix they call “flamingo chow.” Students got to look at the flamingo chow using magnifiers.

Flamingo 2

What do we find in “flamingo chow”?

 

Flamingo feathers come in pink, white, and black. Students got to touch the feathers and feel the difference between the soft underside and smooth outside of the feathers.

Photo Apr 01, 12 46 25

Flamingo feathers are beautiful!

Photo Apr 01, 12 46 57

Observing the soft side of flamingo feathers.

Students also got to touch a replica flamingo skull and real pieces of flamingo eggs. They were much larger than the baby chick eggs hatching in their classroom right now!

Photo Apr 01, 13 01 18

The flamingo egg was very fragile!

Photo Apr 01, 12 42 21

Checking out the flamingo skull.

Photo Apr 01, 12 42 09

Flamingos are filter feeders. Their beaks help them catch krill in the water.

 

We would like to thank the zoo educators, Marley and Caitlin for coming out to Burlington and visiting our classroom and the Science Center!

Photo Apr 01, 13 24 53

Miss Marley with a baby chick from the Science Center!

 

Eagle Scouts Honored by Burlington Science Center March 25, 2015

Posted by MrMusselman in Uncategorized.
add a comment

EagleScoutCOHSpring2015

On Sunday, March 22nd Ms. Pavlicek and Mr. Musselman attended Burlington Troop 103’s Eagle Scout Court of Honor to commend newly minted Eagle Scouts, Luke Iler, Clayton Davidson, Chris Oakes and Eric Salina. The scouts were honored by many distinguished members of the Burlington community before being addressed by Ms. Pavlicek to thank all four gentlemen for selecting the needs of the Burlington Science Center as a central focus to their Eagle Scout service projects.

Eric Salina built a kiosk and did clean up work at the Burlington Community Garden.  Luke Iller and Clayton Davidson built a bird of prey enclosure and fence at BHS.  Chris Oakes built and installed owl nest boxes at all the elementary schools.

As Ms. Pavlicek stated in her speech, “you are honored everyday when Burlington residents see the bird of prey enclosures outside BHS, and when the students at all of our elementary schools plant seeds in the community garden and observe the owl nest boxes at all of our schools.”

EagleScoutCOH2015-2 EagleScout COH2015-3

 

Ms. Pavlicek brought a special surprise to the celebration, a red tail hawk, to honor the eagle scouts for their hard work.  Ms. Pavlicek answered questions from attendees and took photos with the scouts after the program.

FullSizeRenderFullSizeRender-1

Thank you for all your support and congrats eagle scouts!

 

 

Science Center Visit to Burlington Early Childood Center March 19, 2015

Posted by bsciencecenter in Uncategorized.
add a comment

The Science Center recently visited the BECC to teach the students about light, shows and color. We also talked about how animals use color to blend in and survive in their surroundings.

Here is the video of our visit:

Grow Local Event! February 23, 2015

Posted by bsciencecenter in Uncategorized.
add a comment

        Locally Grown Food Builds Community:A New England Food Vision

You are invited to learn about sustainable living, composting, the community garden and a Burlington Farmer’s Market to begin this spring.

grow local

Please join The Burlington Area Chamber of Commerce Charitable Foundation and The Burlington Food Pantry on Monday, March 2, 2015 from 6:30PM to 8:30PM in the Hall at the Grand View Farm, 55 Center Street, Burlington.  This event is free!

BACC_LOGO

 

php4

 

 

 

 

The formal program begins at 7:00PM with a presentation on ‘A New England Food Vision’ by our Keynote Speaker, Brian Donahue, Ph.D., Associate Professor of American Environmental Studies, Brandeis University.  Dr. Donahue will discuss the 50 x 60 Vision – a concept establishing a goal that fifty percent of New England’s food can be grown and distributed locally by the year 2060.

Following his presentation, Dr. Donahue will be joined by panelists speaking on behalf of local CSAs and Farmer’s Markets, including those organizing a Farmer’s Market to begin this spring in Burlington.

For further information, please call the Chamber’s office at 781-273-2523.  The Science Center will be hosting an information table at the event.  Hope to see you there!

garden2

Winter Tracks and Footprints! February 13, 2015

Posted by bsciencecenter in Uncategorized.
add a comment

Winter is the perfect season for observing animal tracks and scat in your backyard. The shape and pattern of the animal track are important when deciding what creatures are venturing outside in the woods or your backyard. I went on a hike last weekend and took a few photos of common Massachusetts animal tracks. Do you recongnize any of these tracks from your backyard?

IMG_7704

This is a classic cottontail rabbit.  This rabbit is running/facing toward the bottom of your screen.  You will see two larger back feet and 2 smaller front feet, one in front of the other.

IMG_7703

This is also a cottontail rabbit, except it is sitting in one place.  Note the round pellet (feces) between the back legs and the front feet are on top.

IMG_7697

This is a white-tailed deer hoof print.  You can see the two separate hoof/toe prints.

IMG_7695

This is a set of squirrel tracks.  They look similar to a butterfly shape.  There are 2 larger back feet and 2 snaller front feet-both feet are close together.

IMG_7702

Another set of squirrel prints.

IMG_7699

IMG_7696

The pictures above are squirrel “digs.”  They are areas where the squirrels have buried their seeds and then proceeded to retrieve them from the snow to eat.

IMG_7701

These are song bird tracks.  Note the two, side-by-side feet and the long drag mark of the bird’s tail.

IMG_7700

These prints are most likely from a fox.  The length of the stride (area between the two feet) and the size of the individual print are important from determining fox or coyote.

What other prints have you seen in your yard or out in nature? If you take the time to look closely and observe the world, you can find the most interesting things around you!  Get outside and look today!

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 33 other followers